Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (2024)

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Author: Sally

Published: 03/23/2019Updated: 01/14/2022

Soft and chewy with that trademark homemade flavor, these are the best soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookies. Made with brown sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, chewy oats, sweet raisins, and a secret ingredient, this recipe wins for flavor and texture. Your family will love these easy oatmeal raisin cookies!

Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (1)

There are two types of people in this world. Raisin haters and raisin lovers. I fall into the latter category. Besides homemade apple pie, oatmeal raisin cookies are my favorite dessert. There’s something incredibly magical about the chewy texture, soft centers, plump raisins, and cinnamon flavor. Please tell me I’m not the only raisin lover!!

What Makes These Oatmeal Raisin Cookies The Best

The competition is strong, but here’s why you’ll fall in love with these cookies.

  • Moist and tender centers
  • Slight crisp on the edges
  • Sweetened with brown sugar
  • Loaded with oats
  • Studded with raisins
  • Cinnamon spiced
  • Buttery flavor
  • 30 minute chill time

It doesn’t get much better than this!

Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (3)

Ingredients in Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

Oatmeal raisin cookies are made with very basic ingredients.

  1. Butter: Butter is the base of any delicious cookie recipe. Make sure you are using room temperature butter.
  2. Brown Sugar + Granulated Sugar: Sugar is not only used for sweetness, but also for providing structure and tenderness. I like to use more brown sugar than white sugar because (1) brown sugar has incredible flavor and (2) brown sugar contains more moisture than white, which produces a softer cookie.
  3. Eggs: Eggs help bind everything together. You need 2 eggs in this recipe.
  4. Pure Vanilla Extract + Salt: Both provide flavor.
  5. Cinnamon: Raisins, oats, and cinnamon are winning flavor combination.
  6. Baking Soda: Baking soda helps the cookies rise.
  7. Molasses: Molasses is my secret ingredient! 1 scant Tablespoon enhances all the wonderful flavors of these buttery, cinnamon-sweet oatmeal raisin cookies.
  8. Flour: Flour is the structure of the cookies.
  9. Oats: There are a ton of oats in this recipe! Oats provide a fabulously chewy texture. I use and recommend old fashioned whole oats here—just like I do for flourless peanut butter oatmeal cookies.
  10. Raisins: I love to soak the raisins in warm water before using. This step is optional, but it guarantees they are plump and soft. Blot dry before adding to cookie dough. (You can also use this cookie dough to make my white chocolate chip cherry oatmeal cookies.)

I like to add chopped walnuts. Nuts are totally optional but highly recommended. These simple ingredients combine to make the best oatmeal raisin cookies!

Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (4)

How to Make Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

There’s only a few steps between now and a batch of warm oatmeal cookies. 🙂

  1. Cream butter + sugars: Use a hand or stand mixer to cream the softened butter with both sugars until smooth, about 2 minutes on medium speed.
  2. Add eggs, vanilla, + molasses: Add eggs, then mix on high for about 1 minute until incorporated. Add vanilla and molasses, mix until combined.
  3. Dry ingredients: Mix flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt together in a separate bowl. Pour this into the wet ingredients. Combine together on low.
  4. Add the extras: Beat in the oats and raisins on low speed. Dough will be thick and sticky.
  5. Chill: Refrigerate the cookie dough for 30-60 minutes.
  6. Roll: Roll cookie dough into balls and place on a lined baking sheet. I love using these baking mats.
  7. Bake: Bake the cookies at 350°F (177°C) for 12-13 minutes until lightly browned. The cookies might look under-baked, but they will continue to set as they cool. This is the secret to a soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookie!

Oatmeal Raisin Cookie Dough is Sticky

This oatmeal raisin cookie dough is sticky, so don’t be alarmed. The cookie dough needs to chill for about 30 minutes before baking. I don’t recommend keeping this cookie dough in the refrigerator for much longer because your cookies won’t spread. The oats will begin to absorb all of the wonderful moisture from the eggs, butter, and sugar and won’t expand as they bake. Sticky dough is good dough!

Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (5)

More Favorite Cookie Recipes

If you love these oatmeal raisin cookies, try any of these SOFT cookie recipes. You’ll wonder why you haven’t baked them sooner!

  • Iced Oatmeal Cookies
  • Peanut Butter Cookies
  • Oatmeal Scotchies
  • Chocolate Chip Cookies
  • Monster Cookies
  • Maple Brown Sugar Cookies
  • Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies

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Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (6)

Soft and Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

5 Stars4 Stars3 Stars2 Stars1 Star4.8 from 847 reviews

  • Author: Sally
  • Prep Time: 45 minutes
  • Cook Time: 13 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 26-30 cookies
  • Category: Dessert
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: American
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Description

Soft and chewy with that trademark homemade flavor, these are the best soft and chewy oatmeal raisin cookies. Your family will love these easy oatmeal raisin cookies!

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (16 Tbsp; 226g) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1 cup (200g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar
  • 2 large eggs*
  • 1 Tablespoon pure vanilla extract (yes, Tablespoon!)
  • 1 Tablespoon (15ml) unsulphured or dark molasses (do not use blackstrap; I prefer Grandma’s brand)
  • 1 and 1/2 cups (188g) all-purpose flour()
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 and 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 cups (255g) old-fashioned whole rolled oats*
  • 1 cup (140g) raisins (see Note below)
  • optional: 1/2 cup (64g) chopped toasted walnuts

Instructions

  1. Using a hand mixer or a stand mixer fitted with paddle attachment, cream the softened butter and both sugars together on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes.Add the eggs and mix on high until combined, about 1 minute.Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed. Add the vanilla and molasses and mix on high until combined. Set aside.
  2. In a separate bowl, whisk the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and salt together. Add to the wet ingredients and mix on low until combined. Beat in the oats, raisins, and walnuts (if using) on low speed. Dough will be thick, yet very sticky. Chill the dough for 30-60 minutes in the refrigerator (do the full hour if you’re afraid of the cookies spreading too much). If chilling for longer (up to 2 days), allow to sit at room temperature for at least 30 minutes before rolling and baking.
  3. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Line two large baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone baking mats. Set aside.
  4. Roll balls of dough (about 2 tablespoons of dough per cookie) and place 2 inches apart on the baking sheets. I recommend using a cookie scoop since the dough can be sticky. Bake for 12-14 minutes until lightly browned on the sides. The centers will look very soft and under-baked. Remove from the oven and let cool on baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. The cookies will continue to “set” on the baking sheet during this time.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead & Freezing Instructions: Cookies stay fresh covered at room temperature for up to 1 week. Baked cookies freeze well—up to three months. Unbaked cookie dough balls freeze well—up to three months. Bake frozen cookie dough balls for an extra minute, no need to thaw. Here’s how to freeze cookie dough.
  2. Special Tools (affiliate links): Electric Mixer (Handheld or Stand) | Baking Sheets | Silicone Baking Mats or Parchment Paper | Cookie Scoop | Cooling Rack
  3. Oats: For these oatmeal raisin cookies, I use old-fashioned whole oats. They provide the ultimate hearty, chewy, thick texture we love!
  4. Eggs: Room temperature eggs preferred. Good rule of thumb: always use room temperature eggs when using room temperature butter.
  5. Raisins: Soak your raisins in warm water for 10 minutes before using (blot very well to dry them) – this makes them nice and plump for your cookies.
  6. Adapted from Loaded Oatmeal Cookies & Oatmeal Creme Pies. Recipe originally published onSally’s Baking Addiction in 2014.
Soft & Chewy Oatmeal Raisin Cookies - Sally's Baking Addiction (2024)

FAQs

What makes cookies soft or chewy? ›

Cornstarch helps product soft and thick cookies. Using more brown sugar than white sugar results in a moister, softer cookie. An extra egg yolk increases chewiness. Rolling the cookie dough balls to be tall and lumpy instead of wide and smooth gives the cookies a bakery-style textured thickness.

Should you soak raisins before baking cookies? ›

Raisins: I love to soak the raisins in warm water before using. This step is optional, but it guarantees they are plump and soft. Blot dry before adding to cookie dough. (You can also use this cookie dough to make my white chocolate chip cherry oatmeal cookies.)

Do oatmeal raisin cookies raise blood sugar? ›

Oatmeal raisin cookies contain whole grain oats with complex carbohydrates and dietary fiber. These carbohydrates provide long-lasting energy keeping you full for long periods of time. This slow-burning type of energy in oatmeal raisin cookies prevents spikes in blood sugar which is important for diabetics.

What is the secret ingredient to keep cookies soft? ›

For soft cookies, use: Brown sugar, as it has a high moisture content and retains moisture better than white sugar. Also, when combined with eggs, brown sugar can prevent spreading (taller cookies tend to be softer and fluffier). Shortening instead of butter or in addition to butter.

What are three factors that contribute to a chewy cookie? ›

Salted butter, softened – I prefer salted butter but you can also use unsalted and add an extra pinch of salt to the dough. Brown sugar – Just brown sugar because we will get the 'granulated sugar' flavor from the corn syrup. Corn syrup – The corn syrup is what makes these cookies CHEWY FOR DAYS.

Why do my oatmeal raisin cookies get hard? ›

Overmixing develops the gluten in the flour, which can produce tough cookies. If the recipe doesn't call for an electric mixer, mix in dry ingredients using a wooden spoon.

Why are my oatmeal raisin cookies flat? ›

If your cookies consistently come out flat, you may have selected the wrong baking temperature. If you bake cookies using too much heat, the fats in the dough begin to melt before the other ingredients can cook together and form your cookie's rise.

Why are my oatmeal cookies dry? ›

Not Enough Moisture: Ensure you're using the right amount of butter in your recipe and that it's at the correct temperature (softened not melted) when you start. Oatmeal cookies require more moisture to stay soft. Consider adding an extra egg yolk or a touch of milk to your dough to enhance moisture content.

How unhealthy are oatmeal raisin cookies? ›

A freshly baked oatmeal raisin cookie on a napkin. Cookies aren't exactly healthy snacks. Although they do provide quick energy and contain some beneficial nutrients, the amounts of saturated fat and processed sugar in most cookies are enough to outweigh their nutritious qualities.

What is the trick to keep baked goods like cookies soft? ›

This simplest kitchen hack you'll ever love!

If you bake too many cookies (as if there is such a thing!) and are concerned about them going stale, just add a slice of white bread to the storage container to keep them from hardening.

Why are my cookies fluffy and not chewy? ›

Using the wrong type of flour (or just too much flour).

Using too much flour will make your cookies too cakey, so try reducing the flour amount by two tablespoons. Avoid using cake flour instead; try a mix of all-purpose flour and bread flour for a more dense and chewy texture.

Does baking soda or powder make cookies chewy? ›

Baking soda is typically used for chewy cookies, while baking powder is generally used for light and airy cookies. Since baking powder is comprised of a number of ingredients (baking soda, cream of tartar, cornstarch, etc.), using it instead of pure baking soda will affect the taste of your cookies.

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